Alex Katz: Quick Light

Alex Katz: Quick Light | Add A LittleIf you didn’t know already, I adore the Serpentine Gallery. It’s a white cube gallery situated in Kensington Gardens and it’s the perfect place to get a quick culture break.

Alex Katz: Quick Light | Add A Little

I’d never seen an exhibition of work by Alex Katz previously but I felt like this was the perfect introduction, highlighting some of his striking works.
I was pleasantly surprised with the collection they decided to display which showed his diverse subject matter, my favourite of which was the images of females.

Alex Katz: Quick Light | Add A Little

I particularly enjoyed how the bright colours of the canvas, especially the orange, stood out against the white walls, making each piece seem iconic.

Alex Katz: Quick Light | Add A Little

The exhibition also looks at other works which I didn’t know much about before coming to see them.  I enjoy how he uses dark colours, such as black and greys, and uses broad brushstrokes to create a dynamic and smoothly rendered image.

Alex Katz: Quick Light | Add A Little

Alex Katz: Quick Light | Add A Little

And if you’re going to see the exhibition, make sure to pop by this years Serpentine Pavilion. Its a wonderful sight of cubes placed into a pyramid composition.

 

Alex Katz: Quick Light | Add A Little

Alex Katz: Quick Light at the Serpentine Gallery
Exhbition runs from 2nd July, 2016 – 11th September, 2016
Open Tuesday – Sunday 10am- 6pm
Free admission

Michael Craig-Martin: Transience

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

Bold colours and bold lines strike into your plane of vision as soon as your step into the Serpentine Gallery filled with works by Michael Craig-Martin.

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

His works have been seen every now and then in the Royal Academy’s summer exhibition and the Saatchi Gallery, but his last large exhibition was in 1989 at the Whitechapel gallery, allowing his a large space of time to create new works, appealing to the contemporary audience.

Craig-Martins work can immediately be recognised by the colourful adaptations of everyday objects, using colours tat contrast each other and provide an arresting vision of a spectrum of hues. A great example of this can be seen below, a sea of magenta with sparks of orange, bright blue, highlighter green and yellow.

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

The exhibition envelopes the viewer into the world of objects symbolising the 21st century, some evoking fond memories of ‘your first so-and-so’ with wall drawings, using thin black paint, of retro phones and televisions, the piece below dating back from 1981.

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

The title of this exhibition is particularly interesting and relevant, transience seems to mean a state that only lasts for a short while, and I think this exhibition perfectly sums up this word. The motifs that he uses emphasises the old and the new, how fashion comes and goes like the snap of the fingers. It’s odd to think that something that came out 10 or 15 years ago now looks ‘old’ in our eyes because of the constantly evolving technology. However, in some way, Craig-Martin has made these items everlasting thanks to the eye catching works he creates.

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

Walking into the main room, it is almost overwhelming. The turquoise walls conflicting with the keyed up colours used in his pieces, the only sense of stillness in the strong black outlines of the objects.

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

One of my favourite pieces in the collection was a sculpture outside, very different from his paintings yet has similarities in the sense of two dimensionality. It’s a bright pink that catches your eye against the sea of brown trees and endless blue sky.

Michael Craig Martin: Transience | Add A Little

This as a wonderful exhibition, packed with works that everyone can enjoy thanks to the large scale, vivid works that retain in your memory and fun factor that he brings to these mass produced products.

Michael Craig Martin: Transience at the Serpentine Gallery
Exhbition runs from 25th November, 2015 – 14th February, 2016
Open Tuesday – Sunday 10am- 6pm
Free admission

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little

Walking into this exhibition, I was unsure of what to expect. I had ofcourse never been in a situation where I was in a room of coloured mist so this was something completely new for me. Stepping in was like opening the wardrobe to Narnia: something so foreign and surprising, yet alluring.

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little

It was something I’ve never experienced before and it’s amazing to be in a room where you’re so unsure of what’s going to happen. Ofcourse nothings going to jump out at you but you don’t know if you’re going to bump into anyone and you don’t know what’s infront of you.

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little

In a way, it’s quite eerie and unnerving. However, it did seem to stimulate my other senses to a higher degree as I seemed to listen closely to what was around me. The aim of this exhibition was to experience different parts of the brain abd stimulate the unconcious.

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little

I loved that this was such an experience in itself and it was so different to be able to experience the piece of art by being in it.

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little

It was such an incredible experience and I highly urge anyone to take a quick trip to the Wellcome Collection to see this exhibition before it’s over!

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink | Add A Little

Ann Veronica Janssens: yellowbluepink at the Wellcome Collection
Exhibition runs from 15th October, 2015 – 3rd january, 2016
Open Tuesday – Saturday 11:00 – 1800 and open Sunday 12:00 – 18:00
Free admission